Unseen giants

The Temple of Poseidon (foreground) and Temple of Hera (background) in the too-seldom-visited site of Paestum, Italy.

Unseen giants

Paestum is in Italy, and was once a Roman city, but it started out as the Greek colony of Poseidonia. The Temple of Poseidon (built around 460-450 BC) is the largest and best-preserved of Paestum’s temples. But in actually, nobody knows for sure which god / goddess it was originally dedicated to; given the city’s original name, it may well have been dedicated to the city’s namesake — but maybe not.

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Long view to the Acropolis

The Acropolis in Athens, as seen from the top of Lycabettus Hill:

Long view to the Acropolis

I don’t seem to see this perspective of the Acropolis very often online, but it turns out that it’s pretty simple to achieve. Lycabettus Hill is in the middle of an urban park in Athens, and while you’ve got some walking to do at first, a funicular can get you the last steep stretch to the top. Or, you can walk the whole way, if you have the time and fortitude to walk the trail up the hill.

Get up to the top with a reasonably long lens, and you’re ready to go. This is an afternoon shot (with light overcast); the lighting should be more-dramatic on a clear day near sunrise.

EXIF:
Olympus E-M1III, M.Zuiko 40-150mm f/2.8 lens
f/8.0, 106mm, 1/640 sec, ISO 200

Looking a bit quiet

Santorini is an awfully popular place, but even it can be quiet during the off-season.

Personally, I really preferred it quiet and nearly empty (late February). No trinket shops were open, the open restaurants were ones the locals liked, and we had no crowds to deal with.

EXIF:
Olympus E-M1III, M.Zuiko 8-25mm Pro lens
f/11, 8mm, 1/320 sec, ISO 200

Temple of Apollo

One of the marquis attractions at the ancient ruins of Delphi in Greece:

Temple of Apollo

According to tradition, this is actually the 5th temple built to honor Apollo at Delphi, being erected in 510 BC. Even then, it had to be reconstructed in 330 BC after an earthquake, and then partially restored after its destruction by Roman emperor Theodosius I in AD 390. The famous oracle at Delphi was centered on a subterranean chamber below this temple.

EXIF:
Olympus E-M1III, M.Zuiko 8-25mm f/4
f/11, 13mm, 1/80 sec, ISO 200

Ready for an audience

The Tholos of Delphi, an ancient structure in the Sanctuary of Athena Pronaia in Delphi, Greece.

Ready for an audience

Originally domed, the Tholos (circular temple) of Delphi would have been seen by a visitor before they reached the Temple of Apollo (thus the sanctuary’s appellation Pronaia, “before” the temple). It originally had twenty Doric columns on its exterior diameter (three have been reconstructed for modern visitors), and ten Corinthian columns on its interior diameter.

The Tholos was built between 380 and 360 BC, and badly damaged in antiquity — first by earthquakes, and later by people salvaging its stonework for building material. Its original purpose is currently unknown.

EXIF:
Olympus E-M1III, M.Zuiko 8-25mm f/4 Pro lens
ISO 200, 25mm, f/7.1, 1/200 sec

A Tale of Two Grips

The Olympus OM-D E-M5III can be the basis of a fantastic small photography system. You get good performance and good features (including weathersealing) in a lightweight, compact package.

But for those of us with larger hands, an E-M5III can be a little too compact.

E-M5III in-hand

And then, of course, people have been reporting problems with the durability of the camera’s mounting plate. So, both usability and camera protection could drive you to adding some sort of grip to an E-M5III. But preferably not something large and/or heavy enough to make the camera as big as its larger brothers in the E-M1 series. Continue reading