Temple of Apollo

One of the marquis attractions at the ancient ruins of Delphi in Greece:

Temple of Apollo

According to tradition, this is actually the 5th temple built to honor Apollo at Delphi, being erected in 510 BC. Even then, it had to be reconstructed in 330 BC after an earthquake, and then partially restored after its destruction by Roman emperor Theodosius I in AD 390. The famous oracle at Delphi was centered on a subterranean chamber below this temple.

EXIF:
Olympus E-M1III, M.Zuiko 8-25mm f/4
f/11, 13mm, 1/80 sec, ISO 200

Ready for an audience

The Tholos of Delphi, an ancient structure in the Sanctuary of Athena Pronaia in Delphi, Greece.

Ready for an audience

Originally domed, the Tholos (circular temple) of Delphi would have been seen by a visitor before they reached the Temple of Apollo (thus the sanctuary’s appellation Pronaia, “before” the temple). It originally had twenty Doric columns on its exterior diameter (three have been reconstructed for modern visitors), and ten Corinthian columns on its interior diameter.

The Tholos was built between 380 and 360 BC, and badly damaged in antiquity — first by earthquakes, and later by people salvaging its stonework for building material. Its original purpose is currently unknown.

EXIF:
Olympus E-M1III, M.Zuiko 8-25mm f/4 Pro lens
ISO 200, 25mm, f/7.1, 1/200 sec

Little house on the Urubamba

This is Salapunku, the first ruin you’ll see on the first day of a 4-day Inca Trail trek.

Salapunku

It was located next to a canal, so may have been involved in administering water from it.  Otherwise, from what I can uncover, it was just a little Inca farm town.

It now overlooks the rail line to Aguas Calientes / Machu Picchu Pueblo — so any local ghosts don’t get much rest these days.

Las Palomas

The House of Doves (A.K.A. Casa de las Palomas) in the Maya ruins of Uxmal has one face that tends to be shown in tourist brochures and online photos.  This is the other (north) face:

Las Palomas

When I last visited, the structure was getting a bit of touch-up work done (thus, the scaffolding you can faintly see in the left of this photo).  I think it’s a very photogenic structure regardless — even on the less-pretty side and with scaffolding in full view.

On guard

This little figure is part of the decoration on the Temple of the Warriors in the Maya ruins of Chichén Itzá, Mexico:

On guard

I’m not sure how tall he is, since he’s mounted at a significant height off the ground, and can’t be seen from up close — you need a reasonably long lens and some perspective correction software to get a shot like this.  Still, if you look closely, you can see that the figure is emerging from the jaws of a feathered serpent, with most of the serpent’s details carved in bas-relief into the building’s stones.