Got my eye on you…

On a hike to see waterfalls along the Johnston Canyon trail in Banff National Park, this little guy was making sure we knew he was around:

Got my eye on you

Normally I’m used to squirrels trying to look cute for a hand-out; this was definitely a territorial display, though. Lots of barking accompanied the serious looks from this little guy. I had to laugh, but felt a bit sorry that I did — he was doing his best to look tough, after all…

Waiting for the season

While we were driving around in Newfoundland, we saw something very foreign to U.S. eyes — the use of highway frontage for family storage (in some spots, gardens too). We didn’t see this in Novia Scotia, so maybe it’s a uniquely “newfie” thing?

Along one stretch of the highway on the west coast of Newfoundland, there were a few miles over which nearly all the dirt roads running off the highway were lined with idle lobster traps.

Waiting for the season

Apparently depletion of the local stocks means that the lobster season is very short — something like a week out of the year. As a result, people have to do something with the traps for 90+% of the time. Roadside seems to work…

It was a gray, overcast day — so the full-color version of this didn’t do much for me. I like the sepia, though. Brings out the texture in the weathered wood.

The scarp

I grabbed this scene along the west coast of Newfoundland, in Gross Morne National Park:

The scarp

Amazing place — during the ice ages, this was nearly all under water. All, except for what are now mountains. Once the ice melted, the land “rebounded,” and what once were fjords became deep valleys (while the nearby seabed became a coastal plain that people live on and tourists drive on).

Rock crystal

A picture from the Hopewell Rocks, in Canada’s Bay of Fundy

Rock crystal

The Bay of Fundy has arguably the highest tides in the world, about 17 meters — the result of an odd resonance in the bay (a wave will travel from the mouth of the bay to the inner shore and back again in about the same time as the spacing between high tides). One of the offshoots of these tides is that a lot of ground gets uncovered at low tide.

Here, you see my daughter (just turned 7 when this picture was taken) standing under the middle of “Lovers Arch.” Come back in 12 hours, and only the green top of the arch will still be above water.